News

Real-time social analytics: how editors become cyborgs

Successful online publishing relies on effective use of web analytics. In order to assess how a story will perform online and where it should be placed, most editors take input from Google Analytics or monitor trends in social media sharing. In many newsrooms there is a dedicated person who monitors statistics and makes recommendations to the editorial team on a frequent basis.

SXSW: Could the future of print be interactive?

“If by 2017 we could connect any piece of print to the internet at a low cost, with recycled material, what would that mean for journalism?” asked Tom Metcalfe, lead designer on Interactive Newsprint, during a panel at SXSW entitled Pitchforks and Printed Electronics.

SXSW: Survival techniques for nonprofit news organisations

As the traditional business model for news flounders, nonprofits have played an increasingly more significant role in maintaining news coverage, particularly in the US. A panel at South by South West Interactive on Nonprofit Journalism: Survival of the Scrappiest gave nonprofits concrete advice on how to tackle some of their key challenges.

SXSW: using sources in the social media age

There has been a fundamental shift in journalists’ relationship with social media, said panelists of the Sources in the Social Media Age session at South by South West Interactive. “Journalists used to apologise for being on Twitter at work,” said Greg Galant, CEO of Sawhorse Media, “now they apologise for not being on it.”

Meme raises questions of racist reporting: Does media have Missing White Woman Syndrome?

An annotated photo of a crime brief from Chicago Tribune’s RedEye spread virally Monday, leading to a barrage of questions about whether news outlets suffer from “Missing White Woman Syndrome (MWWS)”, the tendency to cast aside crime stories with minority victims and instead favor those that affect caucasian females.

Upworthy’s success demonstrates importance of clickable headlines

Viral sharing site Upworthy is like “chocolate sauce on brussel sprouts,” David Carr wrote, and the site’s more than 9 million monthly viewers are licking their lips. The mission of the site, founded last March by former leaders of Facebook, Reddit and BuzzFeed: Give information-packed links a makeover with eye-catching, clickable headlines, and watch as they go viral; watch as headlines inspire people to learn about issues such as gay rights, women’s empowerment and climate change.

Despite journalist’s outrage, Atlantic’s unpaid freelance request is not unique

The Atlantic apologized for offending veteran journalist Nate Thayer when an editor asked him to cut one of his articles for online publication — without pay. Global Editor Olga Khazan told Thayer that the magazine had depleted its freelance budget but suggested Thayer might benefit from exposure on The Atlantic’s website. Thayer vehemently refused, even though unpaid work is an increasing reality for digital freelancers.

Washington Post’s sponsored content launch suggests advertorials here to stay

The Washington Post recently launched its sponsored content platform “BrandConnect,” which allows marketers to create and display blogs, videos and infographics on the newspaper’s website. The Post will be the first major U.S. newspaper to share its platform with advertisers, Digiday reported, and analysts suggest that it certainly won’t be the last.

Le Monde appoints first female editor-in-chief, Natalie Nougayrède

Le Monde has appointed its first female editor-in-chief, Natalie Nougayrède, the paper announced. She was selected by Le Monde’s three main shareholders – Pierre Bergé, Xavier Niel and Matthieu Pigasse – on February 13 and their choice was validated by the paper’s general assembly of editors on March 1.

A ‘terrible loss for Post readers’: Is journalism compromised without ombudsmen?

The Washington Post announced their elimination of an ombudsman position following the expiration of former ombudsman Patrick Pexton’s contract Friday. The paper will instead elect a “reader representative” that will not have the same independence as former ombudsmen.